35. The Future of ARDS Research Roundtable

We are extremely excited for another PulmPEEPs Roundtable table discussion today. We have spent multiple episodes talking about different aspects of ARDS and respiratory failure. Today, multiple expert guests return, as well as a new guest to the show, to discuss the future of ARDS research. This is a can’t miss discussion that is so jam-packed with pearls you’ll have to listen twice!

Meet Our Guests

Carolyn Calfee is a Professor of Medicine and Anesthesia at the University of California, San Francisco. She is a world-renowned ARDS researcher and has authored multiple landmark studies in the field. She previously joined us for a discussion on ARDS precision medicine and phenotypes.

Ewan Goligher is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto and University Health Network. He has published many practice-changing papers in ARDS. These have included prospective studies and some fantastic retrospective analyses that have fundamentally shaped our interpretation of trial results.  He previously came on the show discussing lung and diaphragm protection.

Sarina Sahetya is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins. She is a funded researcher in ARDS and respiratory physiology and has published multiple studies on lung protection and ARDS. She last helped us understand how to titrate PEEP in ARDS.

Matthew Semler is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where he is also the Associate MICU Director and the co-director of the Inpatient Division of the Learning Healthcare System at Vanderbilt. Through his role as Chair of the Steering Committee for the Pragmatic Critical Care Research Group, he has helped lead more than two dozen randomized trials leading to multiple high-impact publications.

Radiology Rounds – 1/31/23

For today’s #RadiologyRounds we have a combined Radiology and Ventilator imaging rounds! You’re in the ICU caring for a young patient on a ventilator when you are called to the bedside for a desaturation.

You perform an inspiratory hold and see that the PIP, plateau, and difference between peak and plateau have all increased. On exam you hear bilateral mechanical breath sounds anteriorly. You order a CXR and the student asks a question about the waveforms

There are pressure deviations corresponding to the flow deviations.

There is no clear patient effort The fact that the PIP and plat have changed makes water in the tubing or cardiac oscillations less likely.

You think this is mucus, with a plug ball-valving in a bronchus

The CXR arrives and shows right lower lobe collapse.

A bedside bronchoscopy is performed with large mucus plugs suctioned out of the RLL and RML. Afterward, the patient’s oxygenation is improved, the flow deviations resolve, and the plateau pressure drops to 19

33. Lung and Diaphragm Protective Ventilation Roundtable

Today the PulmPEEPs are discussing Lung and Diaphragm Protective Ventilation with two experts in the field. We are joined by Dr. Jose Dianti and Dr. Ewan Goligher.

Meet Our Guests

Dr. Jose Dianti is a clinical and research fellow at the University of Toronto and University Health Network. He completed his residency in Critical Care and worked as a critical care attending previously at the Hospital Italiano in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is particularly interested in ventilator induced lung injury and personalized ventilation strategies. Dr. Ewan Goligher is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto and University Health Network, and is a world renowned researcher in the mechanisms of ventilator induced lung and diaphragm injury.

7. Top Consults: Severe Asthma Exacerbation

We are excited to bring you another episode in our Pulm PEEPs Top Consults series! Kristina Montemayor and David Furfaro, are joined by Sandy Zaeh to discuss the assessment and management of a patient with a severe asthma exacerbation. We’ll follow a consult patient from the emergency department to the ICU, and cover everything from the physiology of pulsus paradoxus in asthma to how to manage the ventilator in status asthmaticus. Listen today and please send any questions our way on Twitter @pulmPEEPS.

Meet Our Guests

Sandy Zaeh is an Instructor of Medicine and Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine physician at Yale School of Medicine.

Key Learning Points

References and links for further reading

  1. Chung KF, Wenzel SE, Brozek JL, et al. International ERS/ATS guidelines on definition, evaluation and treatment of severe asthma. European Respiratory Journal. 2014;43(2):343-373. doi:10.1183/09031936.00202013
  2. Rodrigo GJ, Rodrigo C, Hall JB. Acute asthma in adults: a review. Chest. 2004;125(3):1081-1102. doi:10.1378/chest.125.3.1081
  3. Godwin HT, Fix ML, Baker O, Madsen T, Walls RM, Brown CA. Emergency Department Airway Management for Status Asthmaticus With Respiratory Failure. Respir Care. 2020;65(12):1904-1907. doi:10.4187/respcare.07723
  4. Althoff MD, Holguin F, Yang F, et al. Noninvasive Ventilation Use in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Asthma Exacerbations. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2020;202(11):1520-1530. doi:10.1164/rccm.201910-2021OC
  5. Brenner B, Corbridge T, Kazzi A. Intubation and Mechanical Ventilation of the Asthmatic Patient in Respiratory Failure. Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2009;6(4):371-379. doi:10.1513/pats.P09ST4
  6. Laher AE, Buchanan SK. Mechanically Ventilating the Severe Asthmatic. J Intensive Care Med. 2018;33(9):491-501. doi:10.1177/0885066617740079
  7. Leatherman J. Mechanical ventilation for severe asthma. Chest. 2015;147(6):1671-1680. doi:10.1378/chest.14-1733